about

Photo by Sarah Murphy-Kangas

Contemplative, charismatic, and curious by nature, I am currently a Chaplain Fellow specializing in Palliative Care at Stanford Hospital. I am also a member of the Practice PC program of the University of California at San Francisco hospital. I have the privilege of collaborating across disciplines to come alongside patients, their loved ones, and staff members, caring for them at threshold moments, and calling them to their best selves and highest quality of life.

Over the course of my life I have spent time worshipping, serving, and working in several different Christian settings: United Methodist, Presbyterian Church USA, Episcopal, and the United Church of Christ. I served as the Associate for Staff and Ministry Formation at Epiphany Parish of Seattle, as a minister at Liberation United Church of Christ,  and am a Member in Discernment in the Pacific Northwest Conference of the United Church of Christ. While my feet have been walking on a Christian path since childhood, my heart, mind, and practices are open to the wisdom and beauty of other faith and spiritual traditions. Most recently I have been exploring reverent humanism and have been deeply influenced by Buddhist, Muslim, and Jewish teachers and colleagues.  My life has also been transformed by the teachers and practice of yoga at Seattle Yoga Arts

Other significant influences on my self and ministry include the Upper Room's Two-Year Academy for Spiritual Formation, Shanti's Inmate Support Project, a program of the now closed Multifaith Works, where I volunteered as an emotional support volunteer for those incarcerated at the King County Detention Center, and the People's Institute Northwest for Survival and Beyond's Undoing Institutional Racism training.  As one of my seminary professors, Dr. Mark Hearn teaches, and I paraphrase, "we all have intersecting social locations and cultures that create a kaleidoscope lens through which we interpret and project the world and life around us." Our race, gender, sexual orientation, socio-economic status, and other social location markers that determine our societal positions, privilege, and power are constantly shifting depending on our context. Our social locations, whether we want them to or not, affect our images of the sacred, self, others, and the world.  Even as I believe we all have access to a power within us and beyond us, my spirituality has been affected by my embodied experience as a white, mostly middle class, bisexual woman from the Midwest.  I do not expect you to check your embodied realities at the door in order to talk about your spirituality.  I have a spirituality of incarnate life, death, and rebirth and all of who you are is welcome in our conversations.

I completed my Clinical Pastoral Education Residency at Stanford Health Care, my Master of Divinity at Seattle University's School of Theology and Ministry, and my Spiritual Direction training with the Sisters of Mercy at Mercy Center, Burlingame.  I also have a Bachelor of Architecture from Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana. The creative process, reflective practice, and working and living together with honesty and joy are continuous threads throughout my vocational life whether as an architect or spiritual companion.

I live in the Bay area and love exploring the art, architecture, and trees on Stanford's gorgeous campus and surrounding preserves and parks. When I'm visiting my home state of Michigan, I lobby for a pilgrimage to the shores and waters of the Great Lakes. Whether outside or inside you'll find me reading, singing, dabbling with watercolors, and spending time with my dear friends and godchildren.

I look forward to hearing from you. 

Emily
connect@emilylinderman.com